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One in Eight

A Senior Primary Resource About Hunger, Food and Our Role in the World.

Secondary

Description

One in Eight explores the importance of food and nutrition in the world, why it is a basic need as well as a human right, and how food waste is increasingly linked to hunger and what we can do about it.  This review is limited to sections one and two of the resource, which are as follows;

Section two explores the nature, shape and impact of hunger worldwide – the who, where and why of hunger. It includes three lessons;

  • Lesson 5: Myth Busters 
  • Lesson 6: The Biscuit Game 
  • Lesson 7: The Maize Factor

Section three begins a discussion on different types of responses to the issue and how we can contribute to its resolution. It includes four lessons;

  • Lesson 8: The MUAC arm band and Plumpy’nut bars: responding to a food crisis 
  • Lesson 9: Food rights and ending world hunger
  • Lesson 10: The Waste Audit – part 2 42 
  • Lesson 11: Action on World Hunger – the class petition

 

General Assessment

What skills does this resource explicitly teach?

Students have an opportunity to strengthen a number of skills;

  • distinguishing between fact and myth
  • identifying cause and effect
  • taking and defending a position on an issue
  • developing strategies to promote community understanding and action
  • systemic thinking skills

Strengths

The resource focuses on an issue of critical importance - world hunger - challenges the myths surrounding the issue, helps students understand the complexity of the issue, and challenges students to take action to raise greater awareness of the issue.

The inquiry approach adopted by the resource will encourage student interest and interaction and the teacher background and directions are both helpful and effective.

Recommendation of how and where to use it

Global hunger has relevance for any curriculum units dealing with human rights, inequality and injustice, responsible citizenship, sustainable development and the Millennium Development Goals.

Teachers may select those lessons that support their particular curriculum charges and time available.

Relevant Curriculum Units

The following tool will allow you to explore the relevant curriculum matches for this resource. To start, select a province listed below.

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  • Alberta
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    • Grade 10
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      • Social Studies
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        • Social Studies 10-1(Perspectives on Globalization) Globalization & Sustainable Prosperity
        • Social Studies 10-2 (Living in a Globalizing World) Globalisation and Sustainable Prosperity
        • Social Studies 10-4 (Living in a Globalizing World) Globalisation and Sustainable Prosperity
  • British Columbia
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    • Grade 11
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      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Explorations in Social Studies 11: Social justice initiatives can transform individuals and systems
    • Grade 12
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      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Social Justice: Social justice initiatives can transform individuals and systems
        • Social Justice: The causes of social injustice are complex and have lasting impacts on society
  • Manitoba
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    • Grade 12
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      • Social Studies
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        • Citizenship and Sustainability: Area of Inquiry: Poverty, Wealth and Power
        • Citizenship and Sustainability: Area of Inquiry: Social Justice and Human Rights
        • Global Issues
        • Global Issues
  • Northwest Territories
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    • Grade 10
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      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Social Studies 10-1(Perspectives on Globalization) Globalization & Sustainable Prosperity
        • Social Studies 10-2 (Living in a Globalizing World) Globalisation and Sustainable Prosperity
        • Social Studies 10-4(Living in a Globalizing World) Globalisation and Sustainable Prosperity
  • Nova Scotia
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    • Grade 9
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      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Citizenship 9: Engaged Citizenship
        • Citizenship 9: Global Citizenship
  • Nunavut
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      • Social Studies
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        • Social Studies 10-1(Perspectives on Globalization) Globalization & Sustainable Prosperity
        • Social Studies 10-2 (Living in a Globalizing World) Globalisation and Sustainable Prosperity
  • Ontario
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    • Grade 10
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      • Civic Studies
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        • Civics and Citizenship (Open): Civic Awareness
        • Civics and Citizenship (Open): Civic Engagement and Action
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      • Social Studies
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        • Equity, Diversity, and Social Justice (Workplace Prep.) Promoting Equity and Social Justice
    • Grade 12
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      • Social Studies
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        • Challenge and Change in Society (Univ. Prep.) Global Social Challenges
        • Equity and Social Justice: From Theory to Practice (Univ./College Prep.) Addressing Equity and Social Justice Issues
  • Prince Edward Island
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    • Grade 9
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        • Interdependence: Atlantic Canada in the Global Community: Human Rights in the Global Community
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      • Social Studies
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        • World Issues - Wealth & Poverty
        • Social Studies 20
        • Social Studies 20: World Issues -Human Rights
  • Yukon Territory
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    • Grade 11
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      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Explorations in Social Studies 11: Social justice initiatives can transform individuals and systems
    • Grade 12
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Social Justice: Social justice initiatives can transform individuals and systems
        • Social Justice: The causes of social injustice are complex and have lasting impacts on society

Themes Addressed

  • Food & Agriculture (1)

    • Food Security
  • Human Rights (1)

    • Poverty

Sustainability Education Principles

Principle Rating Explanation
Consideration of Alternative Perspectives Good

The resource is based on the assumption that we live in a world with abundant food where there is more than enough for everyone if it is shared more equally and less of it was wasted. .

One in Eight has been written to encourage discussion and debate on the broader values associated with the issue of food and hunger.  It is written and designed to encourage educational inquiry and discussion

Consideration of Alternative Perspectives:
  • Satisfactory: absence of bias towards any one point of view
  • Good: students consider different points of view regarding issues, problems discussed
  • Very good: based on the consideration of different views, students form opinions and  take an informed position
Multiple Dimensions of Problems & Solutions Very Good

The resource takes the position that hunger is the result of a variety of interrelated factors. 

  • Economic -  Poverty is one of the basic causes of human underdevelopment, and is also a result of it. The majority of the world’s poor are unable to afford enough food to feed themselves and their families.
  • Social - Disease can lead to malnourishment, which in turn, makes an individual weak and unable to work in order to feed themselves and their family. Lack of education and poor health for women often mean that children will be born malnourished and the cycle continues.
  • Environmental -With natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, long droughts and tsunamis on the increase, food security in poorer developing countries is severely threatened. The worst affected areas can be found in regions with extreme climates. 

Multiple Dimensions of Problems & Solutions:

Effectively addresses the environmental, economic and social dimensions of the issue(s) being explored.

  • Satisfactory: resource supports the examination of  these dimensions
  • Good:  resource explicitly examines the interplay of these dimensions
  • Very Good:  a systems-thinking approach is encouraged to examine these three dimensions
Respects Complexity Very Good

As indicated above, the resource acknowledges that the causes of hunger are many and the solutions, while doable are challenging. It includes lessons that address the myths surrounding hunger, explores the links between the unequal distribution of wealth and hunger, and link the struggle to end hunger to the larger issue of human rights and the Millennium Development Goals.

The resource might benefit by having students examine the issue of food aid and the debates over the efficacy of such aid.

Respects Complexity:

The complexity of the problems/issues being discussed is respected.

Acting on Learning Good

Lesson 11 is designed to have students raise awareness of world hunger within the broader community. Students crate a petition to educate others about hunger and submit it to local officials and the local newspaper

Acting on Learning:

Learning moves from understanding  issues  to working towards positive change — in personal lifestyle, in school, in the community,  or for the planet

  • Satisfactory: action opportunities are included as extensions 
  • Good: action opportunities are core components of the resource
  • Very Good: action opportunities for students are well supported and intended to result in observable, positive change
Values Education Very Good

An examination of world hunger may be expected to raise questions about fairness, justice and individual and collective responsibility.

Values Education:

Students are explicitly provided with opportunities to identify, clarify and express their own beliefs/values.

Empathy & Respect for Humans Very Good

Sections 2 and 3 of the unit raises the students awareness of the many people who suffer from hunger and malnutrition and it may be expected that student concern for their struggle will follow. The resource, however, does not appeal to the students sense of charity but to their sense of justice by linking the issue of hunger to human rights and by arguing that hunger is not an inevitable condition. 

Empathy & Respect for Humans: Empathy and respect are fostered for diverse groups of humans (including different genders, ethnic groups, sexual preferences, etc.).
Personal Affinity with Earth Poor/Not considered

The focus of the unit is on the human condition in general and the daily struggle for food that is the fate of many.

Personal Affinity with Earth:

Encourages a personal affinity with -the natural world.  

  • Satisfactory: connection is made to the natural world
  • Good: fosters appreciation/concern for the natural world
  • Very Good: fosters stewardship though practical and respectful experiences out-of-doors 
Locally-Focused Learning Good

Much of the resource is focused on hunger where it is most prevalent, i.e. the Developing World. In the more affluent North the issue is often food waste and in Lesson 10, students conduct a waste audit in their school to illustrate this reality. The final activity also has students undertaking an effort to raise awareness locally about global hunger.

Although, the resource does not include relevant lessons, teachers could have students investigate local hunger issues by investigating the efforts of the local food banks.

Locally-Focused Learning:

Includes learning experiences that take advantage of issues/elements within the local community. 

  • Satisfactory: learning is made relevant to the lives of the learners
  • Good: learning is made relevant and has a local focus
  • Very Good: learning is made relevant, local and takes place ‘outside’ , in the community 
Past, Present & Future Good

The resource examines the current reality with respect to world hunger and argues that there is a path to a future where hunger has been eradicated.

Past, Present & Future: Promotes an understanding of the past, a sense of the present, and a positive vision for the future.

Pedagogical Approaches

Principle Rating Explanation
Open-Ended Instruction Good

The sponsor of the resource is an NGO working with the world' poorest people and dedicated to tacking poverty and suffering in the world's poorest countries. Part of that mandate is to meet the challenges represented by world hunger.  This resource seeks to examine some of the underlying ideas, values and causes that make world hunger such a pressing issue – and one that can be solved within our lifetime. This they believe is the "right" answer. 

The activities, however, are intended to educate rather than proselytize.

Open-Ended Instruction :

Lessons are structured so that multiple/complex answers are possible; students are not steered toward one 'right' answer.

Integrated Learning Very Good

The topic of world hunger is a complex one and therefore one that has relevance for a number of disciplines. 

  • Politics - what responsivities do individuals and nations have to the world's hungry? 
  • Economics - what economic forces are at play that may be the cause of world hunger?
  • Geography - what role does natural forces, including climate, have in people's struggle for food security ?
  • Ethics - what is our understanding of a just world?

Integrated Learning:

Learning brings together content and skills  from more than one  subject area

  • Satisfactory: content from a number of different  subject areas is readily identifiable
  • Good:  resource is appropriate for use in more than one subject area
  • Very Good:  the lines between subjects are blurred 
Inquiry Learning Good

Each of the lessons asks students to consider particular questions related to food, malnutrition and hunger - what are the myths about hunger? do people have a right to food? what options are available in responding to world hunger? Students are presented with a variety of activities that allow them to explore these questions.

Inquiry Learning:

Learning is directed by questions, problems, or challenges that students work to address.   

  • Satisfactory: Students are provided with questions/problems to solve and some direction on how to arrive at solutions.
  • Good: students, assisted by the teacher clarify the question(s) to ask and the process to follow to arrive at solutions.  Sometimes referred to as Guided Inquiry
  • Very Good:  students generate the questions and assume much of the responsibility for how to solve them.  . Sometimes referred to as self-directed learning.

 

Differentiated Instruction Very Good

The teaching resources include

  • interactive games of simulations such as the Biscuit game and the Maize Factory
  • case studies
  • student projects such as food waste audits
  • directions for preparing inexpensive, nourishing food
  • preparing and submitting petitions

Differentiated Instruction:

Activities address a range of student learning styles, abilities and readiness.

  • Satisfactory:  includes a variety of instructional approaches
  • Good: addresses  the needs of visual, auditory &  kinesthetic learners
  • Very Good: also includes strategies for learners with difficulties
Experiential Learning Good

Students investigate the larger issue of food waste by conducting an audit of the amount of food they and their schoolmates waste. They experience something of the challenges faced in trying to lobby for a citizen response to world hunger and in organizing petitions and writing magazine articles.

Experiential Learning:

Authentic learning experiences are provided

  • Satisfactory: learning takes place through ‘hands-on’ experience or simulation
  • Good: learning involves direct experience in a ‘real world context’
  • Very good: learning involves ‘real world experiences’ taking place’ beyond the school walls.
Cooperative Learning Good

Some of of the lessons involve students working cooperatively in preparing and presenting their thoughts and ideas on the impact of world hunger, the causes and possible solutions. Others require that they work collectively in preparing a waste audit chart and in devising a plan to reduce the amount of waste in their school. A final project has students develop a class petition and work together in getting community signatures on the petition.

Cooperative Learning:

Group and cooperative learning strategies are a priority.

  • Satisfactory:  students work in groups
  • Good: cooperative learning skills are explicitly taught and practiced
  • Very Good: cooperative learning skills are explicitly taught, practiced and assessed
Assessment & Evaluation Good

The activity based nature of the lessons provide teachers with a great deal of formative evaluation while the student generated articles, artwork, and petitions allow for summative evaluation.

Assessment & Evaluation: Tools are provided that help students and teachers to capture formative and summative information about students' learning and performance. These tools may include reflection questions, checklists, rubrics, etc.
Peer Teaching Good

A number of lessons have students working in groups, making presentations to their classmates or raising awareness in their communities about the realities of world hunger.

Peer Teaching:

Provides opportunities for students to actively present their knowledge and skills to peers and/or act as teachers and mentors.

  • Satisfactory: incidental teaching that arises from cooperative learning, presentations, etc.
  • Good or Very Good: an opportunity is intentionally created to empower students to teach other students/community members. The audience is somehow reliant on the students' teaching (students are not simply ‘presenting')
Case Studies Very Good

The resource was developed in part by an NGO working to meet the challenges of world hunger and the resource includes several case studies illustrating what can and is being done in this respect in the developing world.

Case Studies:

Relevant case studies are included.  Case studies are thorough descriptions of real events from real situations that students use to explore  concepts in an authentic context.

Locus of Control Good

The lessons are structured around defined aims and learning outcomes but are  developed to encourage student engagement in identifying the meaning of, the causes of and the solutions to world hunger.

Locus of Control: Meaningful opportunities are provided for students to choose elements of program content, the medium in which they wish to work, and/or to go deeper into a chosen issue.