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Exploring Canada's Energy Future

Secondary

Description

This resource was created to support teachers in using the Exploring Canada's Energy Future Interactive Tool with their students. Based on data from Energy Futures reports, this tool allows students to explore energy production and consumption trends and forecast them into the future. 

This interactive tool allows users to explore how possible energy futures might unfold for Canadians over the long term. Exploring Canada’s Energy Future employs economic and energy models to make projections — based on a certain set of assumptions — given past and recent trends related to technology, energy and climate policies, human behaviour, and the structure of the economy.

Throughout four different activities, students will:

  • look at the Electricity Generation visualization bubbles for a specific province/territory and attempt to make sense of the information they are seeing and share their findings with the class
  • use the NEB visualizations to support or refute the statements made about energy demand and production in Canadian provinces and territories
  • represent various stakeholders and must convince the investors to invest in their idea rooted in NEB visualizations
  • research the different types of jobs at the National Energy Board that represent a variety of educational trajectories and make connections to activity 3
The activities in this lesson have been designed to promote small group and whole class discussion on factors that affect energy consumption and production trends, anchored in evidence provided by the online tool. The development of media literacy skills has also been targeted by demonstrating how different stakeholders can use the information to support their own energy “stories.” As such, the guide seeks to highlight the nature of geographical thinking, which is more than memorizing facts and figures. Rather, students are asked to analyze elements of time, place, and energy through various economic, political, technological, cultural, and environmental lenses. 

General Assessment

What skills does this resource explicitly teach?

  • Analyze computer infographics
  • Develop media skills
  • Create a presentation

Strengths

  • The resource provides a teacher's guide and contains all the reproducible sheets necessary for the students
  • Rubrics for evaluation are available in the resource
  • The resource is available in French and English
  • The resource is relevant to students since Canadian data is used
  • Several additional activities are available to deepen learning
  • The resource affects several types of learners (visual, kinesthetic, etc.)
  • The resource has a glossary and many additional resources

Weaknesses

  • Community involvement is neglected
  • There is no action plan provided
  • Although the resource is filled with different activities, the choice of activities is prescribed by the resource

Recommendation of how and where to use it

This resource can easily be used in courses of Science and Geography that touch on Canada's energy use. 

Relevant Curriculum Units

The following tool will allow you to explore the relevant curriculum matches for this resource. To start, select a province listed below.

  • Step 1Select a province
  • Alberta
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Electrical Principles and Technologies
        • Knowledge and Employability Science: Electrical Principles and Technologies (Science and Technology Emphasis)
    • Grade 11
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 20-4 (Knowledge and Employability Science): Understanding Common Energy Conversion Systems
        • Science 24:Understanding Common Energy Conversion Systems
  • Manitoba
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Senior 1 Science: Nature of Electricity
  • New Brunswick
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Physical Science: Characteristics of Electricity
      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Canadian Identity: Challenges and Opportunities
  • Newfoundland & Labrador
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Electricity
      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Canadian Identity: Canada’s Changing Identity : Creating a Preferred Future
  • Northwest Territories
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Electrical Principles and Technologies
    • Grade 11
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 24: Understanding Common Energy Conversion Systems
  • Nova Scotia
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 9: Characteristics of Electricity
  • Nunavut
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Electrical Principles and Technologies
        • Knowledge and Employability Science: Electrical Principles and Technologies (Science and Technology Emphasis)
    • Grade 11
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science24:Understanding Common Energy Conversion Systems
  • Ontario
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Geography
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Issues in Canadian Geography (Academic): Geographic Inquiry and Skill Development
        • Issues in Canadian Geography (Academic): Managing Canada's Resources and Industries
        • Issues in Canadian Geography (Applied): Managing Canada's Resources and Industries
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science (Academic):Physics: The Characteristics of Electricity
    • Grade 11
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Environmental Science (Univ/College Prep.) Conservation of Energy
        • Environmental Science (Workplace Prep.) Energy Conservation
  • Prince Edward Island
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Physical Science: Characteristics of Electricity
  • Saskatchewan
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 9
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 9: Physical Science: Characteristics of Electricity

Themes Addressed

  • Energy (3)

    • Alternative Energy
    • Energy Generation
    • Energy Use

Sustainability Education Principles

Principle Rating Explanation
Consideration of Alternative Perspectives Very Good

The activities in this guide have been designed to promote small-group and class-wide discussions on factors that affect energy consumption and production trends, which have been provided by the online tool. Students must research and take positions that are informed about the problems.

Consideration of Alternative Perspectives:
  • Satisfactory: absence of bias towards any one point of view
  • Good: students consider different points of view regarding issues, problems discussed
  • Very good: based on the consideration of different views, students form opinions and  take an informed position
Multiple Dimensions of Problems & Solutions Very Good

This resource seeks to emphasize the erasure of geographic reflection, which is to go beyond memorizing facts and numbers. Instead, this resource requires students to analyze elements of time, place, and energy from different economic, political, technological, cultural, and environmental perspectives.

Multiple Dimensions of Problems & Solutions:

Effectively addresses the environmental, economic and social dimensions of the issue(s) being explored.

  • Satisfactory: resource supports the examination of  these dimensions
  • Good:  resource explicitly examines the interplay of these dimensions
  • Very Good:  a systems-thinking approach is encouraged to examine these three dimensions
Respects Complexity Very Good

The resource allows students to tackle the problem in different ways, using different resources from different sources on the subject.

Respects Complexity:

The complexity of the problems/issues being discussed is respected.

Acting on Learning Satisfactory

In this activity, students must design a project idea to help with different problems on the subject. Although students are just imitating a presentation to investors, one could easily ask them to go further and present their ideas to real investors. 

Acting on Learning:

Learning moves from understanding  issues  to working towards positive change — in personal lifestyle, in school, in the community,  or for the planet

  • Satisfactory: action opportunities are included as extensions 
  • Good: action opportunities are core components of the resource
  • Very Good: action opportunities for students are well supported and intended to result in observable, positive change
Values Education Very Good

The purpose of this resource is to promote the discussion of students' point of view in small groups. Thus, each activity has several questions of reflection.

Values Education:

Students are explicitly provided with opportunities to identify, clarify and express their own beliefs/values.

Empathy & Respect for Humans Poor/Not considered

Not considered in this resource

Empathy & Respect for Humans: Empathy and respect are fostered for diverse groups of humans (including different genders, ethnic groups, sexual preferences, etc.).
Personal Affinity with Earth Satisfactory

This resource demonstrates very well what Canadians use as a source of energy. However, this resource does not discuss the damage caused by the use of these sources to the environment.

Personal Affinity with Earth:

Encourages a personal affinity with -the natural world.  

  • Satisfactory: connection is made to the natural world
  • Good: fosters appreciation/concern for the natural world
  • Very Good: fosters stewardship though practical and respectful experiences out-of-doors 
Locally-Focused Learning Good

This resource focuses on real Canadian data that is related to the lives of learners. In addition, throughout the lesson, students' prior knowledge is shared.

Locally-Focused Learning:

Includes learning experiences that take advantage of issues/elements within the local community. 

  • Satisfactory: learning is made relevant to the lives of the learners
  • Good: learning is made relevant and has a local focus
  • Very Good: learning is made relevant, local and takes place ‘outside’ , in the community 
Past, Present & Future Very Good

In this resource, students must research energy history in Canada, analyze current trends in energy use, and propose a project for Canada's energy future.

Past, Present & Future: Promotes an understanding of the past, a sense of the present, and a positive vision for the future.

Pedagogical Approaches

Principle Rating Explanation
Open-Ended Instruction Very Good

Students are encouraged to develop and share their opinions during class discussions or as reflection questions. Students also choose their own project at the end of the lesson.

Open-Ended Instruction :

Lessons are structured so that multiple/complex answers are possible; students are not steered toward one 'right' answer.

Integrated Learning Good

From this lesson plan, one is able to easily cover elements of science and geography curricula, while becoming familiar with technology.

Integrated Learning:

Learning brings together content and skills  from more than one  subject area

  • Satisfactory: content from a number of different  subject areas is readily identifiable
  • Good:  resource is appropriate for use in more than one subject area
  • Very Good:  the lines between subjects are blurred 
Inquiry Learning Satisfactory

Students are equipped with questions/problems to solve and tips for finding solutions.

Inquiry Learning:

Learning is directed by questions, problems, or challenges that students work to address.   

  • Satisfactory: Students are provided with questions/problems to solve and some direction on how to arrive at solutions.
  • Good: students, assisted by the teacher clarify the question(s) to ask and the process to follow to arrive at solutions.  Sometimes referred to as Guided Inquiry
  • Very Good:  students generate the questions and assume much of the responsibility for how to solve them.  . Sometimes referred to as self-directed learning.

 

Differentiated Instruction Good

The variety of activities in this resource makes it a good fit for visual, auditory and kinesthetic learners. On the other hand, there are no strategies for learners with difficulties.

Differentiated Instruction:

Activities address a range of student learning styles, abilities and readiness.

  • Satisfactory:  includes a variety of instructional approaches
  • Good: addresses  the needs of visual, auditory &  kinesthetic learners
  • Very Good: also includes strategies for learners with difficulties
Experiential Learning Satisfactory

In this lesson we find a simulation of a presentation to investors in relation to energy needs.

Experiential Learning:

Authentic learning experiences are provided

  • Satisfactory: learning takes place through ‘hands-on’ experience or simulation
  • Good: learning involves direct experience in a ‘real world context’
  • Very good: learning involves ‘real world experiences’ taking place’ beyond the school walls.
Cooperative Learning Good

Students must work as a team and must design several presentations and ideas that would not be possible if they did not learn to work well as a team.

Cooperative Learning:

Group and cooperative learning strategies are a priority.

  • Satisfactory:  students work in groups
  • Good: cooperative learning skills are explicitly taught and practiced
  • Very Good: cooperative learning skills are explicitly taught, practiced and assessed
Assessment & Evaluation Very Good

Several opportunities to evaluate student learning are available. Several presentations, reflections and discussions are proposed. There is also a rubric for the final presentation.

Assessment & Evaluation: Tools are provided that help students and teachers to capture formative and summative information about students' learning and performance. These tools may include reflection questions, checklists, rubrics, etc.
Peer Teaching Good

At the end of the activity, students must present a problem as well as a solution in the form of a project. The other students play the role of investor and so must be teaching the problem they are doing. The students making the presentation must then play the role of teacher.

Peer Teaching:

Provides opportunities for students to actively present their knowledge and skills to peers and/or act as teachers and mentors.

  • Satisfactory: incidental teaching that arises from cooperative learning, presentations, etc.
  • Good or Very Good: an opportunity is intentionally created to empower students to teach other students/community members. The audience is somehow reliant on the students' teaching (students are not simply ‘presenting')
Case Studies Very Good

All data used are actual data from Canada. Most of the information is presented using a Government of Canada site.

Case Studies:

Relevant case studies are included.  Case studies are thorough descriptions of real events from real situations that students use to explore  concepts in an authentic context.

Locus of Control Good
Locus of Control: Meaningful opportunities are provided for students to choose elements of program content, the medium in which they wish to work, and/or to go deeper into a chosen issue.